Vijay Htw Manu Fred Mawuli Deegbe accept this National Youth Acheivers award on behalf of the entire global HTW family. Morning Inspiration. HTW Hard Work. Reward. Empowerment photo credit by Salvador Olele Sarpong 

Vijay Htw Manu Fred Mawuli Deegbe accept this National Youth Acheivers award on behalf of the entire global HTW family.

Morning Inspiration. HTW

Hard Work. Reward. Empowerment

photo credit by Salvador Olele Sarpong 


28 year old Fred Mawuli Deegbe (@Freddthtw) Co-founder at HTW
Photo by Adjoa Clarke

28 year old Fred Mawuli Deegbe (@Freddthtw) Co-founder at HTW

Photo by Adjoa Clarke

(Source: ofoesaysit)

A few months ago, around 4:59 pm he was suited up in a bank..waiting for the clock patiently to hit 5…so he could join everybody else in life’s traffic to go home.God is good.Now he rides a bicycle at work.Start something meaningful to the world.Solve the problems as they come. Work Hard. Play Hard. Team HTW

A few months ago, around 4:59 pm he was suited up in a bank..waiting for the clock patiently to hit 5…so he could join everybody else in life’s traffic to go home.

God is good.

Now he rides a bicycle at work.

Start something meaningful to the world.

Solve the problems as they come. 

Work Hard. Play Hard. 

Team HTW

"It was unorthodox, and unusual, but we decided to make shoes. We wanted to show Africa that we were just as capable as entrepreneurs anywhere, of making high end products right here at home. Heel the World is more than a shoe company – it is a social enterprise that counters perceptions of the quality and capabilities of Ghanaian craftsmanship."In the July edition of the Ashesi Bulletin, alumnus, Fred Deegbe ‘06, tells us the story of how he started a shoe company and how he’s using it to “Heel The World.”Read more: http://bit.ly/NBPetv

"It was unorthodox, and unusual, but we decided to make shoes. We wanted to show Africa that we were just as capable as entrepreneurs anywhere, of making high end products right here at home. Heel the World is more than a shoe company – it is a social enterprise that counters perceptions of the quality and capabilities of Ghanaian craftsmanship."

In the July edition of the Ashesi Bulletin, alumnus, Fred Deegbe ‘06, tells us the story of how he started a shoe company and how he’s using it to “Heel The World.”

Read more: http://bit.ly/NBPetv

All of God’s blessings and a happy birthday to our commander in chief Fred Mawuli Deegbe. We love youuuuuuuuuuuuu
photo courtesy:@1mr_miyagi

All of God’s blessings and a happy birthday to our commander in chief Fred Mawuli Deegbe. We love youuuuuuuuuuuuu

photo courtesy:@1mr_miyagi

Co-founders Fred and Vijay speaking at our first public show. We were invited to speak at the African Regent Hotel’s Saturday Night Live event. We thank God for bringing us this far.

Photos from our first public show. We were invited to speak at the African Regent Hotel’s Saturday Night Live event. We thank God for bringing us this far.

My name is Fred Mawuli Deegbe and I am a shoemaker. My dad is a pastor and my mom is an educator – I have witnessed first-hand how they have had a positive impact on peoples’ lives. They have been my inspiration to follow in their footsteps.A few years ago I went to a friend’s place to play video games. At the time I was working in a bank and I was not happy because I didn’t see the impact of what I was doing. I never got around to playing the video games that day because my friend laughed at my shoes so hard he swore that if John Mensah (the captain of Ghana’s national football team) had them he would never score a goal.I tried to laugh it off but he wouldn’t stop. So, I left his house and went to a shop in town in search of shoes that would win me back some social acceptance. I purchased a lovely pair of wingtip oxfords, so shiny I couldn’t wait to see my friend’s smile when he saw them.As I admired them in the window of the store a shoeshine boy walked by. I raced outside to ask him if he could make a pair like these. He said it was impossible. I was stunned. I asked if he could make a shoe not a spaceship! This encounter with the shoeshine boy prompted the journey which I am on right now.It became apparent to me that his mentality was more widespread in Ghana than I thought. And, it troubled me that there is such an overdependence on foreign goods and that local innovation is shunned and not conducive for entrepreneurs.Without any knowledge about shoemaking, I partnered with twenty-one-year-old Vijay Manu to start Heel The World – a high-end shoe company aimed at empowering local start-ups. Heel the World is more than a shoe company – it is a social enterprise that counters perceptions of the quality and capabilities of Ghanaian craftsmanship. Our motto at Heel The World is “we can if we try”. We should follow our passion and the rest of the ingredients needed for success will follow us.The company is a little over a year old and I can see the change in people’s perception of locally made goods already. That is why I was drawn to the theme “One Year One Change”. When I began, many people laughed at me for making Ghanaian shoes. A year later I am on my way to the World Economic Forum in Ethiopia BECAUSE of my Ghanaian shoes.My name is Fred Mawuli Deegbe and I am a shoemaker. This is how I Heel The World.Fred Deegbe is the co-founder of Heel the World and one of 32 @Global Shapers attending the World Economic Forum on Africa. http://forumblog.org/2012/05/heeling-the-world-one-step-at-a-time/

My name is Fred Mawuli Deegbe and I am a shoemaker. My dad is a pastor and my mom is an educator – I have witnessed first-hand how they have had a positive impact on peoples’ lives. They have been my inspiration to follow in their footsteps.

A few years ago I went to a friend’s place to play video games. At the time I was working in a bank and I was not happy because I didn’t see the impact of what I was doing. I never got around to playing the video games that day because my friend laughed at my shoes so hard he swore that if John Mensah (the captain of Ghana’s national football team) had them he would never score a goal.

I tried to laugh it off but he wouldn’t stop. So, I left his house and went to a shop in town in search of shoes that would win me back some social acceptance. I purchased a lovely pair of wingtip oxfords, so shiny I couldn’t wait to see my friend’s smile when he saw them.

As I admired them in the window of the store a shoeshine boy walked by. I raced outside to ask him if he could make a pair like these. He said it was impossible. I was stunned. I asked if he could make a shoe not a spaceship! This encounter with the shoeshine boy prompted the journey which I am on right now.

It became apparent to me that his mentality was more widespread in Ghana than I thought. And, it troubled me that there is such an overdependence on foreign goods and that local innovation is shunned and not conducive for entrepreneurs.

Without any knowledge about shoemaking, I partnered with twenty-one-year-old Vijay Manu to start Heel The World – a high-end shoe company aimed at empowering local start-ups. Heel the World is more than a shoe company – it is a social enterprise that counters perceptions of the quality and capabilities of Ghanaian craftsmanship. Our motto at Heel The World is “we can if we try”. We should follow our passion and the rest of the ingredients needed for success will follow us.

The company is a little over a year old and I can see the change in people’s perception of locally made goods already. That is why I was drawn to the theme “One Year One Change”. When I began, many people laughed at me for making Ghanaian shoes. A year later I am on my way to the World Economic Forum in Ethiopia BECAUSE of my Ghanaian shoes.

My name is Fred Mawuli Deegbe and I am a shoemaker. This is how I Heel The World.

Fred Deegbe is the co-founder of Heel the World and one of 32 @Global Shapers attending the World Economic Forum on Africa. http://forumblog.org/2012/05/
heeling-the-world-one-step-at-a-time/